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Congress sent the bill to reauthorize Title XII of the FISA Amendments Act to the president’s desk on Thursday, the New York Times. The bill extends the provisions, set to expire Friday at midnight, until Dec. 31, 2023. The bill, which contained modest reforms but fell short of privacy advocates hopes, passed the Senate 65 to 34. Read Emma Kohse’s for Lawfare.

Senior officials say the Trump administration aims to relocate the U.S. embassy in Israel to Jerusalem by 2019, the Times . On Wednesday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said to reporters that the U.S. would move the embassy in 2018, but the president suggested that wasn’t his intended timetable. The State Department has decided to convert the U.S. consulate building in West Jerusalem into an embassy, saving money and shortening the timeline for the move. The expedited time-frame may indicate that the administration’s concerns over backlash in the Arab world are diminishing.

A U.S. spy plane took photographs of a Hong Kong-flagged ship transferring 600 tons of oil to a North Korean freighter in the East China Sea, the New York Times. The transfer is believed to be in violation of U.S. sanctions on refined petroleum products entering North Korea. The Wall Street Journal several other such transfers involving ships linked to China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and South Korea.

Jerry Chun Shing Lee, the ex-CIA officer arrested this week as a suspected turncoat, had links to figures within Chinese intelligence both in his official capacity on behalf of the agency as well as under more suspicious circumstances, the Times. Colleagues at Japan Tobacco International, where Lee worked after leaving the CIA, distrusted him, in part because of those contacts, and fired him as a result. Executives at the firm notified the FBI of their suspicions in 2010. Lee’s alleged betrayal is believed to have contributed to the death and arrest of members of the agency’s network of contacts in China beginning that year.

Several Republican lawmakers are demanding a classified memo that they believe contains evidence of political bias within federal law enforcement in connection with the Russia investigation, the Hill . The report, collated by House intelligence committee Chairman Devin Nunes, found support from several members of the Republican caucus. Ranking member Adam Schiff challenged the report as a political attempt to undermine confidence in the bureau: “Rife with factual inaccuracies and referencing highly classified materials that most Republican Intelligence Committee members were forced to acknowledge they had never read,” said the congressman, “this is meant only to give Republican House members a distorted view of the FBI.”

For Defense One, Magnus Nordenman strategies the West can take to respond to Russian submarine activity near undersea cables. Though completely severing communications is a remote, if impossible, scenario, he argues for “resilience and rednancies, along with better monitoring of Russian sub-surface operations in the North Atlantic and elsewhere by NATO and the United States.

ICYMI: Yesterday on Lawfare

Ed Stein the next round of Russia sanction deadlines.

Jack Goldsmith and Susan Hennessey the merits of supporting 702 reauthorization.

Bobby Chesney and Steve Vladeck this week’s episode of the National Security Law Podcast.

Yishai Schwartz his review of “Harpoon: Inside the Covert War Against Terrorism’s Money Masters” by Nitsana Darshan-Leitner and Samuel Katz.

Benjamin Wittes this week’s Rational Security: the “Are You Suuure?” edition.

Matthew Kahn Judge Tanya Chutkan’s order that the government not transfer the John Doe military detainee in Iraq.

Emma Kohse the 702 reauthorization bill that Congress sent to the president’s desk.

Vanessa Sauter the transcript of Fusion GPS CEO Glenn Simpson’s interview with the House intelligence committee.

Bobby Chesney Judge Chutkan’s order.

 

Email the Roundup Team noteworthy law and security-related articles to include, and follow us on Twitter and for additional commentary on these issues. to receive Lawfare in your inbox. Visit our to learn about upcoming national security events, and check out relevant job openings on our .

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mikenova
7 hours ago
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Las Vegas shooter Paddock had child porn on computer, FBI investigating person of interest: sheriff - Fox News

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Fox News

Las Vegas shooter Paddock had child porn on computer, FBI investigating person of interest: sheriff
Fox News
Jan. 19, 2018: Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Sheriff Joe Lombardo holds a press conference for the first time in months. (Fox News). Investigators scanning computers belonging to Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock found “numerous” child ...
Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock probed SWAT tactics, other targets, new report saysCBS News
Probe: Las Vegas shooting suspect's motive remains a mysterySFGate (blog)
Las Vegas Shooting New Pics of Paddock's Room Show Dead Body, Hidden Cams and So Many GunsTMZ.com
Las Vegas Review-Journal -Los Angeles Times -Las Vegas Hotels -PopCulture.com
all 117 news articles »
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New Pentagon strategy takes aim at Russia, China - Politico

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Politico

New Pentagon strategy takes aim at Russia, China
Politico
The Pentagon's new defense strategy calls for aggressive steps to counter Russia and China, directing the military to retrain its attention on great-power competition after nearly two decades of focusing primarily on Islamist militants and "rogue ...
Mattis takes Congress to task for budget impasse as he unveils new Pentagon defense strategyWashington Post
Rising Threats From China and Russia Dominate Trump's Defense StrategyBloomberg
President Trump's New Defense Strategy Is a Return to the Cold WarTIME
NPR -Washington Examiner -Reuters -DefenseNews.com
all 24 news articles »
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Pentagon's new defense strategy - Google Search

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Story image for Pentagon's new defense strategy from The Hill

China, Russia listed as top threats in Pentagon's new National ...

The Hill-1 hour ago
McCain warned, however, that Congress must “immediately reach a bipartisan budget agreement to provide the funding necessary to implement this strategy.” This is the first national defense strategy the Pentagon has released in 10 years. Prior to this, DOD had released in 2014 the Quadrennial Defense ...
National Defense Strategy released with clear priority: Stay ahead of ...
<a href="http://DefenseNews.com" rel="nofollow">DefenseNews.com</a>-4 hours ago
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What is performance crime? - Definition from WhatIs.com

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A performance crime is an illegal act that is committed with the intention of being witnessed by an audience or seeking an audience afterwards. Typically, in contemporary performance crime, the perpetrator records video of the crime or has someone else record it and then posts the video to a social media site such as Facebook, YouTube or Twitter.

Performance crime can take many different forms. Examples include a hacker documenting a cyberattack taking down a website, an attacker recording a sexual assault and a teenager videoing a cyberbullying offense. Of particular concern are violent crimes. In April 2017, Steve Stephens uploaded a video to Facebook of the murder of Robert Godwin Sr., an elderly man who was seemingly chosen randomly. The video was live on the site for two hours before it was removed, and the case raised public awareness of performance crimes.

Other examples:

In 2013, an Ottawa teenager made bomb threat calls to schools all over North America. He shared details of the calls in a series of posts on Twitter, leading to his arrest.

In 2015, Vester Lee Flanagan recorded his shooting of two former co-workers and posted video on Twitter.

In 2017, four people in Chicago livestreamed the torture of a teenager to Facebook.

Criminals seeking attention is nothing new. Ray Surette, a professor in the department of criminal justice at the University of Central Florida, wrote about the phenomenon in his paper, "Performance Crime and Justice." As Surette said in an interview with ABC News after the murder of Robert Godwin, there have “always been people committing crimes with an audience in mind.” What is different now, however, is the ease with which social media allows those people to get their documentation of crimes in front of a large audience.

According to Surette, factors in the development of performance crime include the rise of celebrity culture in the 20th century, extending to celebrity criminals, the goal of achieving celebrity and the prevalence of social media. Surette further argues that, in the mind of the perpetrator, the existence of an audience for performance crimes legitmizes them and makes them socially acceptable. Even more worrisome, it may have the same effect on the audience.

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Violent Crime Rises In UK | Police Focus On "Hate Crime"

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