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(1) Continúa la búsqueda del sospechoso que asesinó a cuatro personas en un restaurante de Tennesse - YouTube

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Continúa la búsqueda del sospechoso que asesinó a cuatro personas en un restaurante de Tennesse
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mikenova
15 minutes ago
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The Puerto Rico Family Office that Bought a Wind Farm

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After years of building an industrial real estate business in Puerto Rico, the older members of Raoul Slavin Juliá’s family were ready to sell their assets and retire. It was 2004, years before the island would face the back-to-back-to-back blows of bankruptcy and two destructive hurricanes, but it seemed like a good time to have a bit of liquidity.

“We looked around and said: What now?” Slavin Juliá, 46, remembers. What he saw on the island were crippling electricity costs and dependency on fossil fuels. The answer to his question, he eventually determined, was blowing all around him. His family would soon start on a journey to become builders and owners of wind farms in Puerto Rico and later the mainland U.S.

Rotor installation at the Kimball Wind Project in Kimball, Neb. in January 2018.

Photographer: Courtesy Gabriel Toste/Treehouse Investments

When he first looked for investment opportunities, in 2007, he discovered why wind farm ownership was the province of utilities: The education process takes years. Due diligence resembles that of industrial real estate, but clean-power plants often require a different sort of financial and regulatory sophistication. “I have never run across another family office competing” for a wind farm, says Slavin Juliá, who is a director of single-family office Treehouse Investments LLC. (The family’s concern about sea levels rising from climate change inspired them to name the business after an elevated house, he says.) The family office owns wind farms through subsidiary Aspenall Energies LLC.

Slavin Juliá’s family built its first wind farm in 2009, a two-turbine facility to power a local Bacardi rum factory. With that success, it looked a couple of years later for opportunities on the U.S. mainland, opting to purchase a newly completed farm for its first utility-scale project. “A family entering now in any U.S. state will find there is a rigorous framework, with a few exceptions,” Slavin Juliá says.

Why did Slavin Juliá’s family choose wind? Well, first, there’s the broad appeal of renewables. Operating wind and solar farms typically benefit from long-term contracts with investment-grade utilities. They tend to perform well, so there’s a high probability of steady, decadeslong revenue. It’s the type of investment that’s now attracting institutional investors such as pension funds and insurers—and appeals to climate-focused family offices such as Treehouse. “If you expect a decent rate of return and your vision is multigenerational, then those two perspectives coincide,” Slavin Juliá says.

The reason for investing in wind instead of solar was mostly situational. Treehouse would consider solar today, he says. In the mid-2000s, however, solar had yet to crack the U.S. mainstream and faced high insurance costs in hurricane-prone Puerto Rico, says Anne Amanda Bangasser, a Treehouse director and Slavin Juliá’s sister-in-law.

One early advantage Treehouse had in getting into the wind business was the specific expertise family members had to handle much of an operating plant’s needs. Slavin Juliá’s background is in law, Bangasser is an engineer, and Slavin Juliá’s wife is an accountant. Still, when the family first decided to invest in a utility-scale wind farm, they didn’t feel comfortable enough to build one from scratch and wanted something that was already “spinning,” Slavin Juliá says. “We thought: Let’s have our first project be one that has already gone through the construction process,” he says. “That way, we can be an asset owner and we can get some experience.”

This story appears in the Q2 2018 Family Offices special report from Bloomberg Markets.

Photographer: Illustration: Mengxin Li for Bloomberg Markets

Over the years, Treehouse built up a renewables network. Family members attended trade shows and engaged consultants in the years they spent building the Puerto Rico wind farm and planning others there. They had something specific in mind: a modest-size utility-scale farm that employed members of the community benefiting from it. They vetted projects in the U.S. and even Europe. Eventually a consultant referred them to a competitive auction for a 20-megawatt farm in Minnesota that had been in operation for several years.

The family won the farm and closed the deal in 2015. They tended to the farm for a while before they felt ready to break ground and actually construct a utility-scale plant. They have since built a 13MW farm in Minnesota and are erecting a 30MW project in Nebraska.

Owning—but not operating—a wind farm can be very desirable to passive investors, given the promised cash flows. But for those who want to build a U.S. project, they’ll need to find a plot of land, obtain permits and address typical Nimby pushback, select a turbine manufacturer and contractor, and arrange financing. That last part can be the trickiest, as financing incentives for renewables in the U.S. rely on esoteric lines of tax code that may create complications for small developers.

For its next investment, Treehouse, which now has offices in New York and Minneapolis, is looking at repowering older wind farms. This involves upgrading turbines to give plants built in the 1990s and early 2000s a second life. Looking back, Slavin Juliá says building up Treehouse’s portfolio wasn’t easy, but he sees wind farms as one of the best tangible investments a family office can own. “Definitely better than yachts, I can assure you,” he says. 

Eckhouse is an energy reporter at Bloomberg News in New York.

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mikenova
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Aumenta a 214 el número de asesinatos en lo que va del año http://bit.ly/2qTn9aX pic.twitter.com/Sn0Giqji7e

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Aumenta a 214 el número de asesinatos en lo que va del año http://bit.ly/2qTn9aX 

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mikenova
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Aumenta a 214 el número de asesinatos en lo que va del año

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El asesinato de una persona en Vega Alta dejó en 214 el saldo de muertes por crímenes violentos que la Policía de Puerto Rico investiga en lo que va del 2018, lo que representa un aumento de 12 víctimas en comparación al mismo período en el 2017.

Jonathan Xavier Rosario, de 29 años, falleció el viernes luego de ser baleado frente al paseo Los Veteranos en la calle Teodomiro Ramírez de Vega Alta. De acuerdo a la información preliminar recopilada por la Policía, Rosario fue baleado por una persona con la que se enfrascó en una discusión.

Rosario falleció en el Centro de Diagnóstico y Tratamiento (CDT) de Vega Alta. La agente Denisse Ortiz, de la División de Homicidios del Centro de Investigaciones Criminales (CIC) de Vega Baja, junto con el fiscal José Sagardía, están a cargo de la investigación.

Junto con el tiroteo registrado en la madrugada del viernes frente al negocio "La Jibarita" en Mayagüez, en el que murió una persona y otras 10 resultaron heridas, son 214 los ciudadanos asesinados en lo que va del año.

La Policía informó que, hasta el momento, los diez heridos se encuentran en condición estable y que los investigadores comenzaron el proceso de recopilar pietaje de las cámaras de seguridad cercanas al lugar de la balacera.

Por su parte, el número de muertes a causa de accidentes de tránsito también registró un leve aumento en comparación al mismo período el año pasado. Cuatro personas fallecieron durante el fin de semana debido a accidentes con vehículos de motor, lo que elevó a 84 el total de víctimas en lo que va del año. Para abril del año pasado la Policía investigaba 81 fatalidades.

Joseph Michael Berríos Rosado, de 21 años, murió el pasado viernes al salir expulsado de la motora que conducía en Hato Rey luego de ser impactado por un Ford Mustang conducido por Jorge Luis Casado Cruz, de 57 años. Casado Cruz arrojó negativo a una prueba de alcohol.

Entretanto, Migdalia Luiggi Rodríguez, de 47 años, perdió la vida el viernes al recibir heridas graves a causa de un accidente entre múltiples vehículos. Luiggi Rodríguez era la pasajera en una minivan Chrysler Caravan, conducida por Sharon Rivera Luiggi, que recibió un impacto lateral en la carretera número 10 en Ponce. El vehículo que impactó a Rivera Luiggi y que causó el accidente se dio a la fuga. Otros tres vehículos se vieron involucrados en el accidente fatal.

Mientras, Jazmín Yaritza Casanova Méndez, de 34 años, falleció el domingo mientras cruzaba la intersección de las carreteras número 3 y 4 de la avenida 65 Infantería al ser atropellada por Cruz M. García Rivera, quien conducía un auto Mercedes Benz GLE350. Aunque García Rivera se negó a someterse a una prueba de aliento en la escena, se le realizó una prueba de sangre en el CDT de San José; no obstante, la Policía no reveló el resultado de la prueba.

Finalmente, Javier A. Matías Castro, de 46 años, murió en la carretera número 2, kilómetro 136.9, en Aguada,luego que, según la División de Patrullas de Carreteras de Aguadilla, se quedó dormido mientras conducía una Jeep Wrangler que impactó un poste de cemento.

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mikenova
54 minutes ago
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RT @20committee: ICYMI: There's an ugly information war being waged by Putin against the West. Guess which side Fox News is on. https://…

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ICYMI:

There's an ugly information war being waged by Putin against the West.

Guess which side Fox News is on.

observer.com/2018/04/report…


Posted by 20committee on Saturday, April 21st, 2018 11:57am
Retweeted by mikenov on Sunday, April 22nd, 2018 2:06pm


1753 likes, 1008 retweets
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mikenova
19 hours ago
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Report Says Fox News Allows Putin Regime to Edit Content in Latvia

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Sean Hannity on the set of “Hannity” in New York City. Paul Zimmerman/Getty Images

A few days ago, I addressed the troubling issue of Sean Hannity, the Fox News star, and his hidden ties to the Trump administration. With the revelation that Hannity shares an attorney with the president—namely the disgraced Michael Cohen, who’s now a key player in the Department of Justice’s investigation of the White House and its secret Kremlin links—it’s high time to ask exactly what sort of “journalism” Hannity is pushing at Fox News.

Moreover, when coupled with my previous revelations of Hannity’s “reporting” of rancid disinformation scripted by Russian intelligence as “news,” plus his clandestine relationship with WikiLeaks—said by President Donald Trump’s own CIA director to be a Kremlin front—Fox News is making itself a player not just in the Trump administration, but a target of any fair and balanced investigation of it. As I stated:

With the revelation that Cohen has been Hannity’s attorney, in some fashion that neither of them wished to disclose, it is even more imperative that Fox News explain why it keeps a Kremlin propagandist without any semblance of professional ethics on the air. If they fail to do so, that network is exposing itself to counterintelligence scrutiny as well.

To the surprise of nobody who has observed that network in action, Fox News quickly decided that Hannity’s ethical missteps regarding Cohen were no big deal. Per its statement on the case: “We have reviewed the matter and spoken to Sean and he continues to have our full support.” Nevertheless, the network’s own media analyst explained that Hannity was clearly in the wrong, ethically speaking, by commenting many times on-air about Cohen, invariably favorably, without divulging his relationship with him.

Other reports are even less favorable to the network and its ethical standards, rather lack thereof. Vanity Fair this week quoted anonymous staffers at the network about what it termed the Hannity-induced “crisis”: “This is the most embarrassing thing I’ve ever seen,” stated one. Another added, “This is bad. It violates every rule of journalism.”

That said, it’s not difficult to divine why Hannity remains on the air. He’s a headliner, the network’s most prominent talker and nighttime draw for its pro-Trump viewers. Moreover, Hannity’s astonishingly close relationship with this White House, viewed negatively as almost a parody of “access journalism” by outsiders, seems to only bolster his position at Fox News. As The Washington Post reported this week, Hannity talks frequently with Trump, serving as a senior advisor to the Oval Office and playing a pivotal role in the administration’s media war against Trump’s enemies—above all Special Counsel Robert Mueller and his investigation of the president’s Kremlin ties. The Fox News star “basically has a desk” in the White House, explained one presidential adviser to the Post.

Normal journalism, this is not. Since I’ve castigated the mainstream media for its fawning over President Barack Obama, allowing his staff to play them like an instrument, particularly regarding foreign policy, let me add that the Hannity case outstrips even those low-points in terms of journalistic integrity. Clearly Fox News is happy to let its leading on-air personality act as a propagandist for Trump. It’s high time for the network to remove “news” from its title if Hannity is its idea of journalism.

Worse, Fox News seems untroubled by the fact that Hannity isn’t just a Trump superfan-cum-consigliere; he also has disturbing ties to the Kremlin and its agents. Since Hannity’s pushing of Russian-scripted disinformation on Americans has been reported for nearly a year, the network can’t say it didn’t know. Fox News therefore is making the unsettling—not to mention potentially politically hazardous—choice to serve as a witting cut-out for the Kremlin’s lie machine.

Perhaps there are no surprises here at all, however. This week, Latvian Public Broadcasting reported an astonishing story about how Fox News operates in their country. As unmasked by a local investigation, Russian-language versions of the network’s programming that are broadcast in Latvia aren’t merely translated; they’re edited for content in a pro-Kremlin direction. Per the report, which cites internal Fox News regulations:

Translators have to follow Russian subtitling guidelines requiring glossing over or ‘softening content’ concerning accidents, homosexual relationships, ‘anti-Russian propaganda,’ narcotics, extremist activities and suicides. For instance, the translators are instructed to ‘soften’ all negative language about the Russian military and space program, policies of the Russian president and government, while positive texts about same-sex relationships have to be made more generalized so they could be attributed to relationships of any kind.

Let’s be perfectly clear here: Fox News is requiring its content being broadcast in a country that is a member of both NATO and the European Union to be edited to be more pleasing to the regime of Vladimir Putin. This is no small matter in Latvia, a country of only two million people, more than one-quarter of whom are ethnic Russians. That minority is habitually exploited by Moscow in its propaganda aimed at NATO’s eastern frontier. For years, the Kremlin has waged an aggressive, full-spectrum information war against Latvia, attempting to foment divisions in that country by making its Russian minority feel alienated and more loyal to Moscow than to Riga. In extremis, many Latvians worry, this noxious disinformation campaign could be a precursor to an actual Russian invasion—an event that has happened several times in the small country’s history.

Fox News is unambiguously on the side of the Kremlin in this information struggle against little Latvia—and the entire Western world. It’s not just what Fox News is beaming into the Baltic states that merits scrutiny. The network’s reports on Latvia for Western audiences—for instance one last month pushed blatant Russian propaganda and cited the Centre for Research on Globalization, a notorious Kremlin disinformation front—likewise deserve investigation.

Above all, Americans should ask what Fox News’ relationship with Putin’s regime actually is. It’s one thing to allow known disinformateurs like Sean Hannity to push Russian-made lies on air; it’s even worse to give Moscow editorial control over its “reporting.” If Fox News is skewing the news in a pro-Kremlin direction for political effect in a free and democratic society like Latvia, they can do it anywhere.

John Schindler is a security expert and former National Security Agency analyst.

Fox News’ Kremlin Ties Go Much Deeper Than Just Sean Hannity
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mikenova
20 hours ago
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